Is the Lord’s Prayer Just a Chant? Part Six

2005-02-28_0857-25

This sentence in the Lord’s Prayer is the one that I understand the least: “Lead us not into temptation.” Why is this difficult to understand? James 1:13 tells us that God tempts no one. We should be happy about that. God tempting us would give us the idea that He is tempting us with something evil. Since He is not evil, He can’t do that. One of the meanings of the Greek word that is translated here “temptation”, “peirasmos,” is also translated test or trial. Therefore, it would read, “Lead us not into trial or testing.” Since the Lord doesn’t tempt anyone, I’m going to lean toward this meaning—but I’m not a Greek scholar by any stretch of the imagination. All I do is use the resources that I have.

Continue reading “Is the Lord’s Prayer Just a Chant? Part Six”

Is the Lord’s Prayer Just a Chant? Part Five

2005-02-28_0857-25Our study of the Lord’s Prayer takes us to this request: “Give us today our daily bread.”

What does that mean? On the face of it, it is simple. “Lord, please supply the food we need today.” That prayer doesn’t have much meaning for most of us today, since we usually have enough food for several days in our cupboards and refrigerators. It would obviously become a desperate prayer if we were living in the conditions that some of our brothers and sisters around the world are. When I pray this, I know there is a bowl of cereal, milk, and a piece of bread somewhere in the near future.

Continue reading “Is the Lord’s Prayer Just a Chant? Part Five”

Is the Lord’s Prayer Just a Chant? Part Four

2005-02-28_0857-25

In this, the fourth installment of our study of the Lord’s Prayer, we’re going to look at the statement, “Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

Before we have arrived at this place of prayer, we have already addressed God as our Father, confessed that He is sovereign and reigns over everyone and everything, and that He is perfectly holy. We have told Him that we want His kingdom to come spiritually in our lives, which means that we want Him to be the King and that we will be His servants. We have also prayed that His kingdom will come in reality, that He will truly reign over all, for all time, regardless of the cost. Therefore, it’s not a divergent thought to express our desire that His will be done in our lives, not ours. Although we may long for His will, we continually find that, all too often, we don’t want His will at all. Therefore, as we express our desire that His will be done, we also pray that He will help “make Your will my desire,” as they song, Purify Me, says.

Continue reading “Is the Lord’s Prayer Just a Chant? Part Four”