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Have you ever been in a large, public venue, where you are the center of attention, and you’re praying for people? If you have, you may have experienced the pressure of this feeling: Are you powerful in the Spirit? Are you—is your ministry—blessed by God? Produce something. Results, please.

In last week’s article, I attempted to strike down the notion that because Christians have had spiritual events in their lives, they should be elevated above others. This week, I would like to look at another danger concerning spiritual experiences: the lust for them.

Look at this passage: “And the Pharisees and Sadducees came, and to test him they asked him to show them a sign from heaven. He answered them, ‘When it is evening, you say, “It will be fair weather, for the sky is red.” And in the morning, ‘It will be stormy today, for the sky is red and threatening.’ You know how to interpret the appearance of the sky, but you cannot interpret the signs of the times. An evil and adulterous generation seeks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of Jonah.’ So he left them and departed” (Matthew 16:1–4).1

The idea that one must “produce something,” which has happened to me and may have happened to you, was at work here. The religious leaders wanted Jesus to demonstrate if He was blessed, if He was powerful, if He could produce results. It didn’t matter that He had performed miracles in the past. “Do it now. Right here.” But Jesus told them they were evil and adulterous. Why?

The consummate sign of His messiahship, Emmanuel-God-With-Us, was not an act of power, like healing or delivering someone from demonic forces, but His death and resurrection—the sign of Jonah, as He said—which would restore the relationship that Adam had lost. It was not, “I have come to show you how powerful I am”—it was “I have come to be the Suffering Servant as prophesied, the One who will lay down His life and be wounded for your transgressions.” Those religious men of Jesus’ time were seeking after something other than that life-giving relationship, thus they were adulterous and evil. The true God, He alone, loves us and brings us true life and fulfillment and sacrificed Himself to do so. Nothing, not even something He did, is to be placed above Him.

As easy and understandable as this truth among Christians is, departure from it is where many of us Pentecostals and Charismatics begin to go astray.

Many years ago, I was at a healing meeting with my wife, Laurie. The call had been given to come forward, get prayed for, and perhaps slain in the Spirit as many had been. One of our relatives gave me an encouraging, gentle push on my back. I didn’t budge. Even then, in my relative youth, thankfully, the Lord had given me a healthy skepticism about such things. Most of you are aware, I assume, of a man who has become famous for this kind of ministry. But I must ask. What is its value? Where do we see this ministry in the New Testament? Please don’t misunderstand me. Being overwhelmed by the Spirit’s power is scriptural. It has happened in places where I was a ministering person. However, thankfully, I had nothing to do with it. I touched no one. No emotional music. No anything. We were just praying as we stood. However, let me tell you that this “slain in the Spirit” stuff has become so significant among Pentecostals that it has become a proof—as well as a healing or deliverance—of the power of the one who is praying.

Wow. You got the goods, baby.

But it has nothing whatsoever to do with the individual’s relationship with God.

That’s how goofy it has become. What has happened to our thinking? If anything at all occurs because one is praying, does the source of that power need to be explained?

Apparently.

So, why do Spirit-filled believers, after having come to the knowledge of Jesus because of His death and resurrection, seek further signs? Because we want to see the miracle-working God do wondrous things? That’s where it begins, perhaps, but it quickly turns into something else, something evil and adulterous.

I understand the yearning for a touch from God. But a touch is not Him. Seeking an experience, being slain, an act of power—none of these are Him and should not be sought. It becomes adulterous because seeking an experience from Him becomes more important than seeking Him.

God is loyal and steadfast. His love and mercies never end. He has made it possible to have a relationship with Him, which you do not deserve—not only a relationship, but a sonship. To have a Brother who died in your place, was punished in your place, and will share His inheritance with you, one you do not deserve. To have a Father who will love and care for you for eternity.

And you want a touch?

Do not seek spiritual signs and experiences. Do not take Him out of the spotlight and put in the spotlight a spiritual event, as thrilling or spectacular as it may be. Seek Him. Seek Him alone.

 

1All Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.

Gif courtesy giphy.com

 

 

 

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