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My wife and I were watching something on television a while back, and, as we usually do, we searched for something to flip to during the commercials. I noticed that one channel was broadcasting a Mormon Women’s Conference, so I thought I’d tune in to see what was being said. I have never heard a Mormon message. A lot of right words were spoken. A lot of stuff about our loving heavenly Father and our Savior, Jesus. A few accounts of personal experiences with God. Some references to what Mormon elders have said.

So much sounded so good.

And so familiar.

I flipped back and forth as the program progressed, but when I noticed that the speaker was addressing “How to Access the Power of God,” I was curious about how she would handle the subject. This is a how-to topic Evangelicals, Charismatics, and Pentecostals sometimes weigh in on, depending on how one views “power” in Christian life. I don’t remember the specifics of the woman’s message, but the overlying theme was that we had to do something to get God’s power.

Again, it sounded so familiar. This you-must-do-something-to-access-God’s-power is an idea that we Christians (and Mormons, apparently) have dreamed up all by ourselves, perhaps with some other-worldly help.

It is stupefying, laughable, and tragic. Yep. All those emotions wrapped up in one messy message package. “Why?” you may ask. “Don’t you want to access God’s power?” Well, let me answer that question by asking another. Can you point out to me in Scripture where we are given instructions about how to access God’s power?

Hmm. Nothing comes to mind except asking for God’s help in certain situations.

The Charismatics and Pentecostals go-to passage for power access is often the second chapter of Acts. But think with me here. What were those Jesus followers doing when the Lord poured out His Spirit? They were all in one place. They were waiting. They were in one accord. Thus, some of us think, if we fulfill these criteria, the Holy Spirit will be poured out upon our gathering. One glaring problem exists however. Those early followers were gathered together, waiting, and in one accord because Jesus had told them to do these very things and promised what would happen if they did. Therefore, faith in a specific promise and a command from God were at work here.

The outpouring at Pentecost was God’s idea. He initiated it. The disciples would never have thought of it.

The outpouring of the Spirit and His power at the house of Cornelius is another example (Acts 10). This gracious act among the Gentiles was not in Peter’s thinking. It originated with God. He told Peter to do something. He did it. The Lord told Cornelius to do something. He did it.

Boom. God showed up.

How about Mary? Was the miraculous conception of the Messiah in her womb her idea? Her response proves otherwise. What did she do to “access God’s power” and become pregnant? She said amen to God’s word, in faith.

Let’s look at the most dynamic use of God’s power in the Old Testament: the deliverance of Israel from Egypt. Was this deliverance Moses’ idea? Hardly. How did Moses “access God’s power”? The Lord told him to do certain things. He did them.

Divine action begins with God. Too often, we Christians think it begins with us.

When the Lord God chooses to do anything through people—to exercise His power—He goes right ahead and does it, regardless of our spiritual condition and knowledge of God’s truth which is, comparatively speaking, woefully abhorrent in the light of His righteousness and foreknowledge.

So, am I saying you should just relax and wait for God? No. I think you should pursue and love the Lord our God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength. However, nothing in that pursuit will earn you access to God’s power. He does what He does with whomever He chooses to do it.

End of story.

So, believer, if God has told you to do something, either in His Word or by a direct, personal command, do it. Then He will do what He will do. Be careful that you don’t boast when God’s gracious, powerful acts happen in your life or in your church. You were there. Yay, you. You were faithful. Even that faith is from God (Ephesians 2:1-10). God did what He did because—He desired to.

Our God is in the heavens; he does all that he pleases (Psalm 115:3).1

 

1The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

Gif courtesy giphy.com

 

 

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